<blockquote style="border-left: 1px solid rgb(204, 204, 204); margin: 0pt 0pt 0pt 0.8ex; padding-left: 1ex;" class="gmail_quote">It polls just by being in the normal queue, it always runs, and yes it<br>
is basically doing the same thing as your<br><div class="im">&gt;&gt; &gt; while (time.time() &lt; timeStart + 2):<br>
&gt;&gt; &gt;     stackless.schedule()<br>
</div>example, but since it is the *only* one doing it, I can have as many<br>
tasklets as I want waiting while it handles all timekeeping.  When I<br>
add a tasklet to the timekeeper internal queue, just sort it based on<br>
time then a simple comparison each loop is perfect.<br><br>
I think the eve demo code had such an example actually now that I think of it.<br></blockquote><div><br>Ok, it does make much more sense to only have a single tasklet polling for the time. And also will have to watch out for the top posting, thanks :)<br>
</div>

<br><div class="gmail_quote">On Thu, Dec 10, 2009 at 4:15 PM, Richard Tew <span dir="ltr">&lt;<a href="mailto:richard.m.tew@gmail.com">richard.m.tew@gmail.com</a>&gt;</span> wrote:<br><blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="border-left: 1px solid rgb(204, 204, 204); margin: 0pt 0pt 0pt 0.8ex; padding-left: 1ex;">
Like most things you do with Stackless, you would do this by blocking<br>
the tasklet on a channel.<br>
<br>
The Stackless Examples project has source code for a variety of<br>
purposes.  For instance, if you take a look at the following page, the<br>
normal and alternative scheduling examples, you can probably see sleep<br>
implementations within them.<br>
<br>
<a href="http://code.google.com/p/stacklessexamples/wiki/StacklessExamples" target="_blank">http://code.google.com/p/stacklessexamples/wiki/StacklessExamples</a><br>
<br>
Cheers,<br>
<font color="#888888">Richard.<br>
</font></blockquote></div><br>Great, thank you for the link, some examples are just what I need.<br><br>Thanks,<br><br>Jeremy.<br>